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Basic Union Rights

Written by Stanley F. Slupik Former NWIAL President


The

Northwest Illinois Area Local

American Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO

194 W. Lake Street Elmhurst, IL. 60126 630-833-0088


BASIC JOB RIGHTS OF NWIAL/APWU REPRESENTED POSTAL EMPLOYEES

By Stanley F. Slupik, NWIAL President


1. You have the right to file a grievance. To file a grievance, you should ask your immediate supervisor for a step 1 grievance, and a union steward to represent you. You do not have to tell the supervisor in any great detail, why you want a step 1 grievance; you need only tell them the general nature of the problem, such as “Article 8”. You should ask for the step 1 as soon as possible after the violation occurs. If you do not request the step 1 within 14 days of the violation, you can no longer file a grievance on that issue. If you do not see the steward within 2 hours, you should attempt to notify any steward on your break or lunch. You have the right to dispute what management does regarding the workplace. Management is prohibited by law and the contract, from retaliating against you for filing a grievance. Many employees do not realize this, and do not challenge many unfair management actions. Of course, the grievance may not prove to be successful in every instance. But you should get into the habit of checking with your union steward, when any of these actions occur. Here are some examples of grievable issues:


a. If you call in for an absence, and management disapproves your PS 3971 (request for leave), you can file a grievance.


b. If management marks your PS 3971 as “unscheduled”, and you feel it should be “scheduled”, you can file a grievance. An “unscheduled” absence can be used against you in future disciplinary action, a “scheduled” absence cannot. To have your absence regarded as “scheduled”, it must be requested and approved in advance. There are some exceptions.


c. If you receive a letter of demand for payment of alleged money owed, you can file a grievance. If you have money taken from your check by management, you can file a grievance. Management must first give you a letter of demand, that fully explains the debt, and they cannot collect the debt as long as your grievance is still in the grievance procedure.


d. If you are in your bid assignment, and assigned to another job, while junior employees stay in your bid, or non-bidders stay in your bid assignment, you can file a grievance. If you are moved from your bid assignment, and replaced by a junior employee or an employee who does not have a bid in your assignment, you can file a grievance.


e. If you are disciplined, you can file a grievance. Even if you feel you “deserved” the discipline, you should still see your steward. A “probation” that reduces the length of time the discipline is in your file, is usually attainable in a settlement.


f. If you feel you are improperly bypassed for overtime or holiday work, you can file a grievance. If you feel you are improperly required to work overtime or on the holiday schedule, you can file a grievance.


g. If an employee from another craft or level works in your bid assignment, and you are on the overtime desired list, you can file a grievance.


h. If your supervisor makes up a new work rule, you can file a grievance.


i. If you are not paid properly, you can file a grievance.


j. If you are harassed or discriminated against, you can file a grievance.


k. If a supervisor does bargaining unit work in your unit, you can file a grievance.


l. If you do not receive your step increase, you can file a grievance.


m. If you feel you should have received your first vacation selection, and did not, you can grieve it.


n. If you do not receive your proper holiday pay, you can file a grievance.


o. If you do not get a bid you feel you should have received, you can file a grievance.


p. If your bid job is abolished, you can file a grievance.